Apprenticeships – Compass MS

03333580340

Search
Close this search box.

Apprenticeship

Why Choose Compass Apprenticeship Programmes?

Engineering

Construction

Risk Management

Level 3 Learning Mentor

Level 3 Learning &
Development Practitioner

Level 5 Coaching Apprenticeship Professional

Learning & Development Suite of Apprenticeships

FAQ's FROM EMPLOYERS

An apprentice;

  • Is usually a young person – but can be anyone over the age of 16
  • Works alongside an experienced employee to learn specific skills
  • Receives training – including training towards nationally recognised qualifications such as NVQs
  • Earns a salary
  • Gets paid holiday

 

An apprentice will;

  • Work alongside experienced staff
  • Gain job-specific skills
  • Earn a wage and get holiday pay
  • Be given time for study related to their role (the equivalent of one day a week)

 

Apprenticeships can also be used to develop current employees, but employers may need to make a contribution towards the costs of their training, depending on the age of the employee.

Yes; as long as they’re aged over 16 and not in any other work or formal education.

 

The aim of the apprenticeship scheme is to:

  • Provide young people with a way of gaining work experience and qualifications in the workplace rather than at college
  • Provide employers with a cost-effective way of growing the next generation of skilled staff
  • Develop the careers of young people in order to maintain the skilled workforce the country needs to run its services

Apprenticeships give anyone over the age of 16 the chance to earn a wage while they train in a real job. It can take between one and four years to complete. All apprenticeships have set content. However, employers can add extra content that meets their specific needs. Most apprenticeships are offered in partnership with a training organisation (a college or learning provider). Apprentices normally work at least 30 hours a week. However, an apprentice’s weekly hours can be reduced if their apprenticeship programme is extended. An apprentice must receive the appropriate minimum wage. Find out more on the GOV.UK website.

Yes. Apprentices have the same holiday entitlements as other employees.

 

Apprentices can benefit your business in a number of ways including better quality products and services, better staff morale and improved staff retention. They can also boost productivity, help you attract better staff and improve the image of your business in the sector.

 

Apprenticeships are available in over 1,500 job roles including project managers, care workers, advanced engineering construction. Apprenticeships start from intermediate level (equivalent to GCSEs) through to higher (equivalent to a degree).

Yes. A member of staff can become an apprentice if they need new knowledge and skills that can be provided through an apprenticeship.

You are legally obliged to have an apprenticeship agreement ready for when they start. That’s a

signed agreement between the apprentice and their employer. It must be in place for the entire

length of the apprenticeship. Employers must pay their apprentices the relevant minimum

wage.

 

No. Apprenticeships are for anyone who wants to earn and learn at the same time. Higher Apprenticeships can include degrees.

 

You are legally obliged to have an apprenticeship agreement ready for when they start. That’s a signed agreement between the apprentice and their employer. It must be in place for the entire length of the apprenticeship. Employers must pay their apprentices the relevant minimum wage.

Yes. You must pay at least the relevant national minimum wage set by the government through your usual payroll process.

Apprentices aged under 19, or in their first year, must be paid the apprentice minimum wage rate. Higher Apprentices, those over 19 or after their first year, must receive the minimum wage rate that applies to their age. In some cases, you may also contribute towards the cost of training.

 

Once an apprenticeship finishes, the employer may extend the apprentice’s employment contract through progression into
another role or a further apprenticeship (if appropriate).

There is no obligation for an employer to retain their apprentice. However, most apprentices do stay with their employer – only 14 percent of London employers reported their apprentice had left after completing the apprenticeship.

Apprenticeships take between one and four years to complete depending on the level of the apprenticeship, the industry sector and the apprentice’s ability.

 

FAQ's FROM STUDENTS

What apprentices say they enjoy most about being an apprentice is:

  • The money – getting paid while we learn!
  • The qualifications through work experience rather than exams
  • The work environment and the variety of work on offer
  • The opportunity to find out what we’re good at and do it
  • A fantastic alternative to college or university
  • The great start to our careers
  • Feeling valued and appreciated in the world of work
  • The support from good line managers and NVQ assessors

You can expect support from:

  • Your line manager
  • Your tutor(s)
  • Your Compass Learning Support Adviser –

They will all know a lot more about your apprenticeship than anyone else.

Where do I find out about apprenticeship vacancies

  • Look on the National Apprenticeship website where many vacancies are listed Find an Apprenticeship Service
  • Approach employers who may have vacancies

Many employers are keen to keep their apprentices at the end of their training and try to find suitable posts for them when the apprenticeship ends. There is no guarantee of a job at the end of the apprenticeship but by completing it your chances of getting another job are very much greater. If you were already employed before you started your apprenticeship – your current terms and conditions of employment should remain unchanged.

Each apprenticeship with Compass has an ‘Apprentice Journey’. An overview of this is available on the webpage – and once your enrol added details will be given during your induction and introductory workshop. In summary – there are four main stages:

Induction and introductory workshop

Learning and achievements of included training and qualifications

Gateway where you compile a portfolio of evidence

End Point Assessment – where you demonstrate you learnt what was required during your apprenticeship from your employer and Compass.

You will have regular progress reviews with your employer and learning support adviser to make sure you are on track to complete the learning journey within the timescale.

 

You and your employer will need to discuss this with your Learning Support Adviser in order to agree what will work in your job role and for you.

You’d most likely be working within a company four days a week, doing the job and learning from your colleagues. You also might be given specific training or set tasks to help you develop your skills.

Then you’d study perhaps one day a week, where you’d learn both academic and vocational (hands-on) skills that are tailored to your job.

On top of this your apprenticeship coordinator from college would drop in to see you at work from time to time to check you’re getting on well.

 

You have to be aged between 16 to 64 years.

Yes. Apprentices have the same holiday entitlements as other employees.

Once an apprenticeship finishes, your employer may extend your employment

contract although there is no obligation for them to. However, most apprentices do

stay with their employer – only 14 percent of London employers reported their apprentice had

left after completing the apprenticeship.